Friday, February 7, 2020

Spying and Privacy in American Society Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Spying and Privacy in American Society - Essay Example The lack of privacy in the United States is a direct violation of our freedom and needs to stop in order for the country to regain the ideals that were implement by our forefathers. In â€Å"Take My Privacy, Please!†, Ted Koppel presents the idea that the Patriot Act, while an invasion of privacy, is the least of our worries at this time. He looks at companies like OnStar, which have the power to monitor a subscriber’s every move. That idea can be taken even further, since many cell phones are now equipped with GPS, which can be activated by certain applications and even remotely from a computer. This makes it very difficult to stay away from corporate monitoring. Koppel states that corporate monitoring is even more dangerous than government monitoring because it can be used for marketing purposes. This, however, seems to oversimplify the influence of the Patriot Act. The idea that the government could have access to this essay and could interpret its thesis as being an ti-American and, therefore, terrorist in nature is much scarier than a corporate entity learning my television watching habits and sending spam to my inbox. Both privacy concerns are very real, but the Patriot Act is taking us towards an Orwellian society where we are watched 24/7 by Big Brother, which would eliminate freedom as we think we know it very quickly. Amitai Etzioni's article, "Less Privacy is Good for Us", takes more of a stance on the issue of privacy. Etzioni believes that we need to re-examine the idea of privacy and put it into a context that matches up with the problems in today’s society. Much of his argument focuses on immigrant, disease and crime and his argument would hold value if these were the only reasons for this surveillance. He states that countless illegal immigrants end up in the United States because of the government’s inability to track these people. The same can be said for criminals who end up escaping from prison because they can dis appear into society and never be found. If everyone was tracked 24/7, however, we could see the need for prison decreased or nearly eliminated. After all, the police would know where every criminal is at all times, so no one would have the chance to commit a crime. The problem is that this would apply to everyone else in society. If you want to walk to your neighbor’s house for a drink after work, you would be monitored. For freedom to truly exist, we need the ability to do things without anyone knowing about them. Under this type of society, the government could prevent you from going where you want to go at any time and would have the means to know if you have disobeyed. This does not make the country safer, but would rather force everyone to live in fear of the government. "The Myth of the 'Transparent Society'", by Bruce Schneier, refutes the idea that a completely transparent society could be the answer to the problem of surveillance. While transparency is a good thing i n some situations, it would not work on a wide scale because there are situations where information should be kept secret. Schneier's opinion is reasonable because there has to be a difference in the power between a police officer and a criminal, for example. Taking the privacy away from everyone at every level does not solve the problem because it could lead to a chaotic society. If an ordinary citizen could approach an undercover detective and begin questioning him or her, it could make

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Wiccan traditional covens Essay Example for Free

Wiccan traditional covens Essay Wiccan traditional covens are formed thru male-female pairs thus making an obstacle for single members. The traditional practice do not however make any moral judgments about homosexuality according to Sanders (1987). The traditional covens criticize male-male or female-female pairings that is often seen as dangerous, in producing a mutually productive balance and is viewed as outside the mainstream Wicca. The understandable criticisms of traditional wiccans on the radicalism attached to gay members practicing wicca spins around the roles of a traditional heterosexual family as related by Curottt (2005). Traditional craft says that there is impossibility in working magic for two men in a gay relationship according to Salomonsen(2002). Though homosexuals cannot be barred from wicca, traditional values bar them from high ranks on the basis of sexual orientation. This contrast is an apparent reason for members to shy away from the pressures brought about by their own original group and join others or start a solitary practice. Like other religious denominations, the wiccan practice has formed dissenting opinions from other members and groups. This is highly conceivable considering the group’s lack of a centralized organization that commands a theological doctrine as a guideline for every practitioner. Like other religions, those who do not conform to the standard form their own sub-groups in order to liberalize them from the restrictions created by their own organization. Naturally, the mainstream aspect of the practice is retained as evidenced by the unified stance of Mary Anne, Sheila, Cris and Carol who vehemently denied any incorporation of evil practices and witchcraft into the wiccan religion. I firmly believe that the Wiccan practice as a religion depends upon a person’s moral and religious convictions. Most practitioners are happy with their practice because they are afforded the freedom to entertain their beliefs. The mere intolerance for hatred which is liberally taught and positively interpreted in wicca as the acceptance of other individuals is an ethical basis that any religion should uphold. Most likely, the lack of a centralized organization mandating doctrines of practice enables a group or an individual to freely incorporate or deviate from their belief and rituals without the pain of ridicule. Further, the lack of a centralized body reaping the benefits acquired from religious practice prevents conflicts from escalating which often results in a major religious disintegration. Wicca, as a religious practice teaches acceptance, love for nature and life. We can always distinguish that other religious denominations despite a strong stance against wicca have incorporated the age-old neo-pagan practices of the wiccan culture in their own beliefs. We do not have to enumerate the similarities which certainly show that the wiccan practice has long evolved even before man learned to integrate religion and culture into their social lives. Works Cited Rountree, Kathryn. Embracing the witch and the goddess: Feminist Ritual-Makers in New Zealand. London: Routledge, 2004. http://kindredspirit.co.uk/

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Breakthroughs in Astronomy and Medicine in the 16th and 17th Centuries :: science

Breakthroughs in Astronomy and Medicine in the 16th and 17th Centuries It was during the 16th and 17th centuries when man's view of the unvierse and himself changed drastically. This came after a millenium of repetition and stagnation in the development of science. People finally began questioning what they were told, and they went out to find proof rather than assuming on the basis of authority and common sense. These advances in astronomy and medicine came about in the same era, and were not unparallel in their development. In both fields were some very notable people who contributed greatly to the devolopment in these areas. In the field of astronomy Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo shed Aristotle's, Plato's, and Ptolemy's views of the universe. In medicine Paraclesus, Vesalius, and Harvey did away with Galen's ancient practices. Ancient Greeks believed that the Earth was stationary, they concluded this by making some basic obsevations. One being that the Earth cannot be part of the 'heavens' because celestial bodies are bright points of light, whereas the Earth is a nonluminous sphere of mud and rock. Also in the heavens there is very little change, the same stars are there night after night, only five planets, the sun, and the moon. On Earth however things are constantly changing and reforming. Their senses also told them that the Earth wasn't moving. They believed that the air, the clouds, and the birds would all be left behind if the Earth spinning around, therefore it couldn't be moving. Also if the Earth were spinning everything would fly off due to the centrifugal force. It was thought that with all this evidence there was no way that the Earth could be moving. There were however a few descrepencies in this Earth stationary or geocentric view. The most apparent being the five planets. They moved unlike anything else, they moved contrary to the stars and occasionaly went backwards. Ptolemy was able to correct this by the use of epicycles. This said that not only do planets orbit the Earth, but they also have smaller circular moton which they perform during their orbit. This did solve the problem, but it was still imperfect and very complicated, it was un-Godlike. Nicolaus Copernicus believed in the heliocentric model of the universe. It was his belief that the sun was a copy of God, God gave us life and the sun kept us alive. Breakthroughs in Astronomy and Medicine in the 16th and 17th Centuries :: science Breakthroughs in Astronomy and Medicine in the 16th and 17th Centuries It was during the 16th and 17th centuries when man's view of the unvierse and himself changed drastically. This came after a millenium of repetition and stagnation in the development of science. People finally began questioning what they were told, and they went out to find proof rather than assuming on the basis of authority and common sense. These advances in astronomy and medicine came about in the same era, and were not unparallel in their development. In both fields were some very notable people who contributed greatly to the devolopment in these areas. In the field of astronomy Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo shed Aristotle's, Plato's, and Ptolemy's views of the universe. In medicine Paraclesus, Vesalius, and Harvey did away with Galen's ancient practices. Ancient Greeks believed that the Earth was stationary, they concluded this by making some basic obsevations. One being that the Earth cannot be part of the 'heavens' because celestial bodies are bright points of light, whereas the Earth is a nonluminous sphere of mud and rock. Also in the heavens there is very little change, the same stars are there night after night, only five planets, the sun, and the moon. On Earth however things are constantly changing and reforming. Their senses also told them that the Earth wasn't moving. They believed that the air, the clouds, and the birds would all be left behind if the Earth spinning around, therefore it couldn't be moving. Also if the Earth were spinning everything would fly off due to the centrifugal force. It was thought that with all this evidence there was no way that the Earth could be moving. There were however a few descrepencies in this Earth stationary or geocentric view. The most apparent being the five planets. They moved unlike anything else, they moved contrary to the stars and occasionaly went backwards. Ptolemy was able to correct this by the use of epicycles. This said that not only do planets orbit the Earth, but they also have smaller circular moton which they perform during their orbit. This did solve the problem, but it was still imperfect and very complicated, it was un-Godlike. Nicolaus Copernicus believed in the heliocentric model of the universe. It was his belief that the sun was a copy of God, God gave us life and the sun kept us alive.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Religion in Film: a Comparison of Fight Club and Antz Essay

At first glance, David Fincher’s â€Å"Fight Club† and Dreamworks Studio’s â€Å"Antz† could not be more diametrically opposed to each other in form and genre. One is a dark commentary on the vacuity of modern life, fraught with homoerotic subtext; the other is a brightly animated cartoon where the bad guy dies, the good guy gets the girl, and everybody lives happily ever after. I intentionally chose these two films, however, for their thematic similarity, to examine the recurring motif of striving for identity in a society of conveyer belt roles where the value of the individual is quickly depreciating toward extinction. By analyzing both films through a theological and Freudian lens, I intend to reveal the tension that has always existed between possessing the freedom of choice and submitting to an oppressive, delineating structure. â€Å"Antz† opens up with a disembodied voice announcing its anxieties. As the camera penetrates layers of New York underground, the voice is revealed to belong to a lonely ant. He is in therapy. We soon learn that his name is â€Å"Z† and he is a disgruntled worker ant, airing his frustrations over working all his life and never quite feeling satisfied. One is expected, as an ant, to devote all his efforts toward the good of his colony and deal with his needs being ignored. This is a common grievance, felt among the spectrum of classes and races. Regardless of status, hardly anybody ever feels he is getting his. Before we have time to dismiss Z’s grouchiness as trivial angst, the camera pans out and introduces us to the â€Å"gung-ho super organism† of ant life. What we see is a hyper complex built by and on millions of bodies that link together to drive the meticulous engine that runs and perpetuates the system. It is impossible to make out any one creature from the swarm of activity. We see elevator pulleys marked with phrases lik e â€Å"Let’s Work† and â€Å"Conquer Idleness,† a chilly reference to the Nazi motto that likewise drove millions of human souls to a state of dejection reflected in the demeanor of the worker ants, as well as Ed Norton’s character from Fight Club. We see ants producing their bundled babies for appraisal, where they are systematically (one might say, arbitrarily) assigned a role in the microcosm. Roles like â€Å"worker† and â€Å"soldier† are shouted out at random and these tiny cocoons, before even having a sense of their individuality—what Freud called recognition of self as separate from the mother (colony)—they are deprived of it. They are then designated a place in the hierarchy that will forever  determine their value by output. This systematic allocation of significance by measure of the whole in turn leaves the individual feeling utterly insignificant (Brintall 303). This is the way of life and up until now it went largely unquestioned. As everybody will tell Z, one ant is meaningless. It is not about him it’s about â€Å"us, the team,† working endlessly to build and acquire more, and he would do best to content himself with it and be happy. Don’t think too much. Think ing leads to rogue individualism that puts the whole microcosm in jeopardy. There appears to be no room for pleasure in this life. Even activities intended to relieve pressure and stress, such as dancing and drinking, are normalized, structured. Socializing too has its place, as the ants are transferred from one ghetto to the next. Ants dance in a group and any who desist are either bullied back into submission or removed entirely. If one may speak of computerized ants in a sexual nature, we can observe how the libidinal economy is so tightly controlled in their environment that all drive toward freedom and creativity is squelched. Inner desires have been buried under dirt and exhaustion and thus, if Freud was correct and our energy drive must be pointed somewhere, the eros is redirected toward work, ungratifying as it may be (Brintall 296). It is transferred into idolizing the strength inherent in uniformity, as personified by the macho General Mandible, who’s face comes as close to sexual gratification as an ant’s could when glancing out at the swarming and sweating organism. Although pleasure is at odds with pain, when all prospects for it are denied, pain—the endurance of reality—becomes the only frontier where any pleasure can surface (Brintall 299). It is through pain that the Narrator in â€Å"Fight Club† asserts his identity, his masculinity and his divorce from the whole of society. He feels the punch, not the corporation he slaves for. That scar, that bruise, that burn is on his body and his alone. But this is later in the plot, which it makes little sense to spend time recapitulating, as you are most likely already familiar with it. Rather, I would like to isolate and review specific incidents to connect them with themes of religion and sociology. Though the repressive system of collectivism is not stated as overtly in black and white as in â€Å"Antz,† it is clear that the totalitarian regime in â€Å"Fight Club† is modern consumer culture. Having returned home (after successfully realizing his alter-ego Tyler Durden) to find his apartment  blown to pieces, the Narrator (who’s name is necessarily inconsequential) laments the loss of his beloved designer wardrobe and catalogue dining room set. What are we, asks Tyler? And the answer is infamous: we are consumers. Consumers who exhaust themselves to emptiness, working to fulfill a false dream, to acquire and acquire, believing each new possession will bring them closer to feeling complete. Human beings work to be the masters of their domain, a domain filled with the products of other human labor and frustrations of their own lack and inability to conquer it fully (Brintall 297). All creative energy and hope is transferred into consumerism, an oppressive system we ourselves helped create and perpetuate and thus permit it to establish mastery over us. And what are we told when we inevitably find ourselves feeling even more empty than where we started? To lighten up and not dwell on â€Å"it.† What is this â€Å"it†? This is the â€Å"it† that keeps the Narrator up at night; the â€Å"it† that inspires Z to run away in search of freedom, in search of release; the â€Å"it† that leads both characters into the next stage of their development in their search for meaning and identity; the elusive â€Å"it† that excites the first blow and enables both the main characters to opt out of being just another avatar in the assembly line of human souls and go in search of something better, something else. For Z, it is a perfect utopia where insects can choose their own roles in life instead of being handled by the institution. For Tyler, it is a dystopia, perfect in its chaos and lack of oppressive structure. Each character makes a conscious choice to pursue a different course in life, meaning to demonstrate how individuality is a by-product of free will. But how free are human beings, really? Closer inspection reveals that neither character liberate s himself from structure, and especially not from idolatry. His focus simply shifts toward romanticizing a more bohemian lifestyle (or perhaps it is the audience’s focus that shifts). Although â€Å"Fight Club† is rarely referred to as romanticized. In his commentary about the film, director David Fincher talks about the meticulously sloppy care devoted to the film by exposing it to durations of harsh light, stretching contrast, and similar distortion techniques used to achieve the washed-out, deconstructed picture—a nod back to the film noir genre that characterized the inescapable dreariness and nihilism of the war-time era when life was so desperately devoid of all purpose or intrinsic value. But Tyler encourages  us to send all our pre-constructed notions of value and purpose to hell, and face reality. The reality is that there is no greater meaning, no utopia â€Å"beyond the mast and across the river,† as swears Z, and that putting one’s faith in redemption or God is useless, seeing as how in all pro bability â€Å"God hates you.† It is not surprising he feels this way, given the direct correlation between God and the father. Both films are interlaced with the issue of fatherly abandonment. When the scene first opens up on Z reclining in his therapist’s office cavity, we are subjected to the comical farce of an ant theorizing that his anxieties are most likely rooted in his childhood abandonment issues: his father crawled out on him when he was just a maggot. One cannot help but feel the cinematic hilarity of a tiny ant who’s immense feelings of inadequacy are not only mirrored by our own, but are actually in consensus with our estimation of an ant (and thus ourselves). In a similar exchange between the Narrator and Tyler Durden, the former recalls his father’s proclivity for fostering families all over and then walking out on them. To which Tyler, soaking nonchalantly in a tub in front of his ‘friend’, cogently replies the man is â€Å"setting up franchises,† as though the nurturing of children was nothing more than a simple business transaction. So how can these â€Å"thirty year old boys† be expected to enter into, as Freud wrote, normal, heterosexual society when their lives have been devoid of the strong authority of the father? (Freud handout) After all, â€Å"Our fathers were our models for God,† points out Tyler, â€Å"If they left, what does that tell you about God?† But to abandon our search for the divine is impossible, for in religion there lie answers. With the help of religion we can extract meaning. We see the Narrator attending support groups for the terminally ill in an attempt to establish a connection and find meaning, once again with pain as the currency. By witnessing the pain of other people’s realities, he finds pleasure, he finds acceptance and release—and sleep. These groups are for him akin to communion, a place where pent-up energies can be redistributed. Whatever the grievance, whatever is lacking in this life, a spiritual gathering maintains the possibility for ho pe. Religion thus becomes not just an outlet, a place where the eros can stir and the soul can come alive, but a way to compensate for the â€Å"longing for paternal protection,† the feeling of emptiness rooted early in childhood. Even as Tyler argues that religion is ineffectual, we realize  that in a society where children’s mental and social development is outsourced to vacuous advertisements, those products and ads take the place of the father—and eventually God himself. As â€Å"Fight Club† evolves and membership in the bloody communion grows larger and larger, we see the film come full circle. What began as a search for meaning beyond identification with a repressive system of consumerism, swelled into its own macrocosm (not unlike institutionalized Atheism) fueled by identical and nameless, yet willful, automatons. They are still participating in a society that extinguishes rogue individuality, but they are doing so by choice. Still, human beings need something to elevate and hold up as God, as the ideal. So they elevate Tyler Durden. They elevate fight club, the reality of owning your pain because pleasure is a blinding myth. Are human beings therefore truly free to make their own choices, is the abiding theological and sociological question. The task of determining the controlling force of society—religious collectivism, political collectivism, even anarchical collectivism—nags at our notion of free will. Of course in â€Å"Antz,† it being a kid’s film after all, the tyranny is embodied in one character. In â€Å"Fight Club† it is intentionally disembodied, in-your-face yet still invisible. â€Å"Our great war,† Tyler advocates, â€Å"is a spiritual war.† One might think if we just do away with consumerism, religion, any system, the subconscious would be free to express its most inner desires. But we discover this is not so. There doesn’t seem to be any more meaning or truth in the Ikea catalogue than in the eventual culmination of Project Mayhem, which conspires for the destruction of all authority and material idols—what Freud would deem the death drive. Though the characters in â€Å"Fight Club† have been so disheartened by the lacking prospect of creativity and purpose, and now seek to destroy everything they’ve ever identified with, they are still not free. Perhaps it is only through losing oneself in God, in work, in different institutions, each with their own offerings of value, that one can seek out one’s unique identity. It is possible that the hope for something better—be it called enlightenment, utopia or deeper understanding—allows one to exercise free will in the pursuit of meaning and pleasure, if never finding either itself. Works Cited 1. Anker, Roy M. â€Å"Narrative.† 2. â€Å"Antz.† (1998, dir. Eric Darnell) 3. Brintnall, Kent. â€Å"Psychoanalysis.† 4. â€Å"Fight Club.† (1999, dir. David Fincher) 5. Freud, Sigmund. â€Å"Civilization and Its Discontents.†

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Analytical Essay for “In Cold Blood” Truman Capote - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 1 Words: 348 Downloads: 2 Date added: 2017/09/25 Category Literature Essay Type Analytical essay Did you like this example? Analytical Essay for â€Å"In Cold Blood† Truman Capote, in his narrative â€Å"In Cold Blood†, characterizes Holcomb, Kansas as a dull and trivial town. Capote expresses his views of Holcomb through diction and contrast. In the passage, Capote’s diction helps the reader to understand his view on Holcomb as being insignificant and boring. Words such as â€Å"irrelevant sign†, â€Å"haphazard hamlet† and â€Å"falling-apart post office† portray Capote’s view on the â€Å"lonesome† village. A picture of the irrelevant town is also painted when Capote describes different parts of it; â€Å"the streets, unnamed, unshaded, and unpaved† is a good example of his choice of words. Capote also describes the people wearing â€Å"rawhide jackets†, â€Å"denims†, and â€Å"cowboy boots†, showing the small, western town style of the village’s inhabitants. Capote’s diction is an important ro le in expressing his views about Holcomb, and informing the reader of how unimportant the town is. Capote’s choice to contrast certain aspects of the town also helps to convey the â€Å"aimless congregation† of Holcomb. At first, Holcomb is described as an ordinary town with â€Å"flat land†, being somewhat â€Å"out there† and its people having an â€Å"accent barbed with a prairie twang. † These boring qualities of Holcomb are supported by Capote’s allusions to the â€Å"ramshackle mansion†, â€Å"one-story frame affairs†, and the â€Å"peeling sulphur-colored paint† of the depot. After Capote has built this view of Holcomb, he contrasts the town with an unanticipated outlook on the town. He describes the school as â€Å"modern and ably staffed†, the people as â€Å"prosperous†, and that Finney County â€Å"has done well. The contrast of different parts of Holcomb make you wonder what other things abo ut Holcomb are you not aware of. Truman Capote expressed his views of Holcomb to be uneventful and having no significance what so ever. He was able to communicate his views to the reader through his choice of diction and the way he contrasted different features of Holcomb. Capote’s choice of rhetorical devises help to set up the town of Holcomb in the way that foreshadowed an event that will forever change the town. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Analytical Essay for â€Å"In Cold Blood† Truman Capote" essay for you Create order

Friday, December 27, 2019

Terrorism Safety vs Privicy - 1594 Words

Ever since 9-11, we as a country have been divided on many issues. One of the most discussed considers the question of whether retaining our privacy is more important than ensuring our safety. The two texts I will be using to explore this question are: Mobile Phone Tracking Scrutinized by Nikki Swartz Published in the Information Journal, which bills it’s self as â€Å"the leading source of information on topics central to the management of records and information worldwide†(347), in March/April 2006 and Reach Out and Track Someone by the author Terry Allen which appeared in the May 2006 edition of In These Times, a publication â€Å"dedicated to informing and analyzing popular movements for social environmental and economic justice†(347). In†¦show more content†¦Allen also asserts the â€Å"disturbing† practice of locating one’s children and spouse by way of an internet site titled Wherefi.com that can give the purchaser real-time locat ions and dates thereof. While Swartz and Allen agree that the use cell phone tracking logs must be monitored and used cautiously, they strongly disagree on the role cell phone companies, law enforcement and government are playing in monitoring the use of the technology. I find Swartz’s view to be based in logic and not emotion. The view that Swartz presents is more balanced. She believes that the government and judicial system are working diligently to ensure that the rights of citizens are protected. In this article Swartz does not seem to recognize the invasion of privacy that this technology poses, she also seems to ignore the way that police and state could abuse the technology. Allen’s approach is much darker. Allen claims that the Bush administrations notoriety for warrant less wiretapping has spread to the Justice Department. Allen cites sources that report the Justice Department â€Å"routinely uses a baseless legal argument to get secret authorizations†(349). In this article, Allen sees conspiracy around every corner and fails to see that this technology could be useful in saving lives and protecting our country from foreign and domestic threats. He is blinded by

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Heroes A Comparison Of Beowulf And Wolverine - 750 Words

From the medieval times to the aftermath of World War II we have two different but extremely similar hero figures in history. One was Beowulf, an inexperienced warrior who turned into a developed king. The other was what some would call abnormal who was later turned into a science experiment known as Wolverine. Beowulf and Wolverine are very harsh and pitiless when it comes to conflict. From ripping limbs off with crude strength to tearing their enemies into pieces, it goes to show just how extreme their fight scenes can get. Heroes are seen as selfless people and are idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, and noble qualities. (Rebecca Ray) These men both fall under the category of what people consider a hero. In Beowulf’s†¦show more content†¦(Cinia McGough) Beowulfs motives for sailing to Denmark are complex. First, he is a young warrior eager to earn glory and enhance his reputation. He can expect to be rewarded well if he is victorious; also, only through fame and honor can a warrior hope to gain a measure of immortality. (CliffsNotes) The most substantial difference between Wolverine and Beowulf is that Wolverine is scientifically made, while Beowulf is all natural. Wolverines entire skeletal structure, including his claws, have been artificially bonde d to the nearly indestructible metal Adamantium. Also, Wolverine has self hate in himself, while Beowulf is self confident in everything he does. (Cinia McGough) Beowulf demonstrates great strength and ability in his conquests and has great prestige. Beowulf’s belief in himself is what helps him to succeed. To accompany that statement, Beowulf is also apart of the community, while Wolverine lives in self-exile. Beowulf becomes more of a positive hero, while Wolverine has more hate in him and others. Beowulf and Wolverine have more similarities than differences. Both of these heroes use their allies in a time of need; Beowulf used Wiglaf to fight the Fire Dragon and Wolverine uses Sabertooth when fighting the wars through history. (Cinia McGough) Wiglaf is the only soldier willing to risk his life to help his ruler. He declares that he would rather be burned to death than to abandon his king,